World Congress of Philosophy Virtual Issue

By Bailey Morrison

Beginning August 13, philosophers from around the globe will gather in Beijing at the World Congress of Philosophy. Organized every five years by the International Federation of Philosophical Societies (FISP), the congress addresses pressing philosophical issues. This year’s theme, “Learning to be Human” discusses the intricacies of humanity. Topics to be addressed include education,  the environment, social learning, and governmental policy. The list below features articles that hit on some of the key subjects expected to be addressed.

education

Play’s the Thing: Wherein We Find How Learning Can Begin

Neuromedia and the Epistemology of Education

Brokering to support participation of disadvantaged families in early childhood education

Rethinking Vulnerability in the Age of Anthropocene: Toward Ecologizing Education

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A Confucian‐Kantian Response to Environmental Eco‐Centrism on Animal Equality

Mill’s Philosophy of Science

Beyond Eschatology: Environmental Pessimism and the Future of Human Hoping

Environmental Responsibility

 

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Joint Action and Plural Self‐Consciousness

Imitation from a joint action perspective

Repair: The Interface Between Interaction and Cognition

Modern moral and political philosophy

politics

The Inner Life of Democracy: Learning in Deliberation between the Police and Communities of Color

Engagement, passivity and detachment: 16‐year‐old students’ conceptions of politics and the relationship between people and politics

Lying in Politics: Fake News, Alternative Facts, and the Challenges for Deliberative Civics Education

A retrieval of historicism: Frank Ankersmit’s philosophy of history and politics 

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Hypatia Symposium – Interview with Petra Tschakert

Petra Tschakert, Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and The Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI) at Pennsylvania State University, discusses important themes in gender and climate change for the Hypatia Special Issue on Climate change.

Browse the entire special issue of Hypatia here

Interview conducted by C. Shaheen Moosa.

Hypatia Symposium – Interview with Nancy Tuana

Nancy Tuana, Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Rock Institute for Ethics at Pennsylvania State University, discusses important themes in gender and climate change for the Hypatia Special Issue on Climate change, which she co-edited with Chris Cuomo.

Browse the entire special issue of Hypatia here

 

 

Interview conducted by C. Shaheen Moosa.

 

Journal of Applied Philosophy Annual Prize

Get a sample copy

The Journal of Applied Philosophy will henceforth award an annual prize of £1000 to the best article published in the year’s volume. The first award will be made in respect of Volume 28 (2011). The judgement as to the best article will be made by the editors of the journal.

Journal of Applied Philosophy provides a unique forum for philosophical research which seeks to make a constructive contribution to problems of practical concern. Open to the expression of diverse viewpoints, the journal brings critical analysis to these areas and to the identification, justification and discussion of values of universal appeal.  Journal of Applied Philosophy covers a broad spectrum of issues in environment, medicine, science, policy, law, politics, economics and education.

Population Pessimism

Population is a touchy subject. It certainly divides people. There is no better example of this than James Delingpole’s latest tirade against those who advocate seemingly drastic, sometimes fascistic, methods of population reduction. In this case, the target took the shape of BBC TV naturalist Chris Packham. Delingpole was provoked into his polemic by recent comments Packham reportedly made to the Radio Times:

There’s no point bleating about the future of pandas, polar bears and tigers when we’re not addressing the one single factor that’s putting more pressure on the ecosystem than any other – namely the ever-increasing size of the world’s population. I read the other day that, by 2020, there are going to be 70 million people in Britain. Let’s face it, that’s too many. Continue reading “Population Pessimism”

“Because It’s There” – Philosophy and Climbing

Philosopher’s Eyeballers might be interested to know that there’s another book in the ‘Philosophy for Everyone’ stable on climbing (subtitle ‘Because It’s There‘). The book is a pretty in-depth look at various issues, centring around risk, ethics and other issues. It also includes essays that challenge commonly accepted views of climbing and climbing ethics.

Interview: What Is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter?

We recently interviewed Fritz Allhoff, co-author (along with Patrick Lin and nanoscientist Daniel Moore) of What Is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter?: From Science to Ethics. Fritz talks about his motivations for writing, and the unique approach of the book.

Philosopher’s Eye: Why did you decide to write What Is Nanotechnology…?

Fritz Allhoff: Back in 2004, my colleague Patrick (Pat) Lin and I started nanoethics.org, a non-partisan group that provided a forum for social and ethical implications of nanotechnology. Our previous work had been in applied ethics—particularly the ethics of emerging technologies—and nanotechnology was beginning to draw a lot of attention. We got funding from the US National Science Foundation for some of our work, and this monograph emerged from that grant.

PE: What makes this area interesting to you? Continue reading “Interview: What Is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter?”