Call for Papers – Critical Philosophy of Race: Beyond the USA

Call for papers for a proposed special issue of the Journal of Applied Philosophy.

japp-coverSince the publication in 1992 of Professor Kwame Anthony Appiah’s In My Father’s House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture, the new discipline of the Critical Philosophy of Race has flourished among anglophone ‘analytic’ philosophers. Yet Critical Philosophers of Race have tended to confine themselves to an analysis of racial problems that arise in the politics, and against the historical background, of the USA. This focus has given the false impression that the Critical Philosophy of Race is irrelevant outside the USA. To challenge this false impression, the Journal of Applied Philosophy proposes to publish a special issue, guest edited by Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman (UCL) and Albert Atkin (Macquarie), on the relevance of the Critical Philosophy of Race beyond the US experience.

Deadline for submissions: 31 January 2015.

Please address any initial enquiries about submissions to the guest editors:
Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman n.coleman@ucl.ac.uk
Albert Atkin albert.atkin@mq.edu.au

Submissions should be sent to jap@appliedphil.org

Guidelines for submissions can be found here.

Advertisements

Journal of Applied Philosophy 2011 Article Prize Winner

The editors of the Journal of Applied Philosophy are pleased to announce the winner of the 2011 annual article prize. Congratulations to Jakob Elster who was awarded the £1000 prize for his article How Outlandish Can Imaginary Cases Be?

 The Journal of Applied Philosophy will continue to award an annual prize of £1000 to the best article published in the year’s volume. The judgement as to the best article will be made by the editors of the journal; the Society for Applied Philosophy annual lecture, published in the journal, will not be eligible for the prize of best article.

 

Journal of Applied Philosophy Annual Prize

Get a sample copy

The Journal of Applied Philosophy will henceforth award an annual prize of £1000 to the best article published in the year’s volume. The first award will be made in respect of Volume 28 (2011). The judgement as to the best article will be made by the editors of the journal.

Journal of Applied Philosophy provides a unique forum for philosophical research which seeks to make a constructive contribution to problems of practical concern. Open to the expression of diverse viewpoints, the journal brings critical analysis to these areas and to the identification, justification and discussion of values of universal appeal.  Journal of Applied Philosophy covers a broad spectrum of issues in environment, medicine, science, policy, law, politics, economics and education.

Journal Club: Killing, Letting Die and the Morality of Abortion

‘The Philosopher’s Eye’ Journal Club will be bringing you top articles for discussion on a regular basis, selected from the prestigious Wiley-Blackwell Philosophy journals. The article will be made free to access for all, and engagement and commentary is encouraged.

This month’s free article is Killing, Letting Die and the Morality of Abortion by Anton Tupa, and was one of the Journal of Applied Philosophy’s most read articles from 2010.

Image: Bill Davenport (2007)
Killing, Letting Die and the Morality of Abortion

ANTON TUPA

abstract David Boonin, in his A Defense of Abortion, argues that abortions that involve killing the foetus are morally permissible, even if granting for the sake of argument that the foetus has a right to life. His primary argument is an argument by analogy to a ‘trolley case’. I offer two lines of counterargument to his argument by analogy. First, I argue that Boonin’s analogy between his trolley case and a normal unwanted pregnancy does not hold. I revise his trolley case in light of my objections. Second, I argue that Boonin’s arguments for the permissibility of killing, when applied to this revised trolley case — and by extension, typical unwanted pregnancies — do not succeed in justifying killing.

Journal of Applied Philosophy

FREE: