American Philosophical Association Eastern- Virtual Issue 2019

By Elizabeth Levine

 

In January 2019, the American Philosophical Association will hold its Eastern meeting in New York City. In honor of the One Hundred and Fifteenth meeting, Wiley has compiled a free collection of the top cited articles in Philosophy from our publishing partners journals. This collection can be read by anyone until March 31st 2019.

Journal of Applied Philosophy

Resolving the Tensions Between White People’s Active Investment in Racial Inequality and White Ignorance: A Response to Marzia Milazzo

Theoria

Why Do Irrational Beliefs Mimic Science? The Cultural Evolution of Pseudoscience

Ratio

A Brief Argument For Consciousness Without Access

Mind & Language

The epistemic innocence of clinical memory distortions

Metaphilosophy

On the Philosophy of Bitcoin/Blockchain Technology: Is it a Chaotic, Complex System?

Dialetica

A Demonstration of the Causal Power of Absences

Bioethics

Empathy, social media, and directed altruistic living organ donation

Journal of Philosophy of Education

Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?

Hastings Center Report

Sequencing Newborns: A Call for Nuanced Use of Genomic Technologies

Hypatia

Tracking Privilege‐Preserving Epistemic Pushback in Feminist and Critical Race Philosophy Classes

History & Theory

THE ALLURE OF DARK TIMES: MAX WEBER, POLITICS, AND THE CRISIS OF HISTORICISM

Philosophical Issues

LOGICAL NIHILISM: COULD THERE BE NO LOGIC?*

Nous

Gettier Across Cultures

Philosophical Forum

Big Data and Transcendental Philosophy

The Southern Journal of Philosophy

Thinking in the Zone: The Expert Mind in Action

Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science

THE HUMAN BEING SHAPING AND TRANSCENDING ITSELF: WRITTEN LANGUAGE, BRAIN, AND CULTURE

Philosophy & Public Affairs

Future People, the Non‐Identity Problem, and Person‐Affecting Principles

Journal of Social Philosophy

Modeling Inclusive Pedagogy: Five Approaches

Analytic Philosophy

Real Definition

Journal of Chinese Philosophy

CONFUCIANISM AND UBUNTU: REFLECTIONS ON A DIALOGUE BETWEEN CHINESE AND AFRICAN TRADITIONS

 

 

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World Congress of Philosophy Virtual Issue

By Bailey Morrison

Beginning August 13, philosophers from around the globe will gather in Beijing at the World Congress of Philosophy. Organized every five years by the International Federation of Philosophical Societies (FISP), the congress addresses pressing philosophical issues. This year’s theme, “Learning to be Human” discusses the intricacies of humanity. Topics to be addressed include education,  the environment, social learning, and governmental policy. The list below features articles that hit on some of the key subjects expected to be addressed.

education

Play’s the Thing: Wherein We Find How Learning Can Begin

Neuromedia and the Epistemology of Education

Brokering to support participation of disadvantaged families in early childhood education

Rethinking Vulnerability in the Age of Anthropocene: Toward Ecologizing Education

environment.jpg

A Confucian‐Kantian Response to Environmental Eco‐Centrism on Animal Equality

Mill’s Philosophy of Science

Beyond Eschatology: Environmental Pessimism and the Future of Human Hoping

Environmental Responsibility

 

brain.jpg

Joint Action and Plural Self‐Consciousness

Imitation from a joint action perspective

Repair: The Interface Between Interaction and Cognition

Modern moral and political philosophy

politics

The Inner Life of Democracy: Learning in Deliberation between the Police and Communities of Color

Engagement, passivity and detachment: 16‐year‐old students’ conceptions of politics and the relationship between people and politics

Lying in Politics: Fake News, Alternative Facts, and the Challenges for Deliberative Civics Education

A retrieval of historicism: Frank Ankersmit’s philosophy of history and politics 

New Philosophy Spotlight App!

Philosophy Spotlight is a free must-have app for philosophers brought to you by Wiley. This exciting new app gives you the following community features at your fingertips, anywhere, anytime –

• Latest information on key conferences and latest conference tweets
• A free, comprehensive Frommer’s travel guide to major conference locations
• Latest abstracts for articles and books, including the ability to ‘follow’ your favorite publications
• Latest free Sample Issues for key journals
• Latest Special Issues, including free articles
• Access to video and audio podcasts
• Latest posts from key blogs
• Access to a series of Publishing Workshops, in audio and PDF format
• Access to the Wiley-Blackwell Social Sciences & Humanities Facebook page
• Links to key societies
• Customizable Syllabi Search tool to find syllabi freely available on institutional websites, perfect for generating teaching ideas
• Customizable YouTube search tool to find educational videos
• Customizable search tools for Wiley Online Library
• The ability to bookmark any content you see, email yourself a Reading List and share content via Facebook and Twitter
• The ability to add your own RSS feeds, allowing you to keep track of your favorite sources

Find out more and download for free.

Virtual Conference Report: Day Four (22 Oct, 2009)

800px-COP14_11by Paula Bowles

The conference today has taken on a distinctly environmental feel. First up was Mark Macklin’s (University of Wales, Aberystwyth) keynote address entitled ‘Floodplain Catastrophes and Climate Change: Lessons from the Rise and Fall of Riverine Societies.’ In his paper, Macklin observes that ‘[w]e are not the first society to face the threat of environmental catastrophe,’ although he stresses that the current threat has unique features.

Susan Morrison (Texas State University – San Marcos) has taken a highly interdisciplinary approach to her paper ‘Waste Studies ‐ A New Paradigm for Literary Analysis, Something is Rotten in the Denmark of Beowulf and Hamlet’. By combining the disciplines of literature and waste studies, Morrison offers a reminder ‘that the origins of the Anglophone literary canon are sedimented in waste’.

Tim Cooper (University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus) continued this theme of waste with his paper ‘Recycling Modernity: Towards an Environmental History of Waste.’ By taking as a starting point the belief that ‘waste was one of the characteristic products of modernity’ Cooper is able to consider why this subject is so fascinating to historians and other social scientists.

Before we head into the fifth day of the conference, just a quick reminder to visit the virtual book exhibit. As a delegate, you are invited to take 20% off the price of any Wiley Book.