Cheshire Calhoun wins Journal of Applied Philosophy 2015 Essay Prize

Congratulations to Dr. Cheshire Calhoun, winner of this year’s Journal of Applied Philosophy Essay Prize.

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The Journal of Applied PhilosophyThe editors of the Journal of Applied Philosophy are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2015 essay prize is Cheshire Calhoun for her article, “Geographies of Meaningful Living“, published in the February 2015 issue.

The £1000 award is granted to the author of the best article published in that year’s volume. We offer Dr. Calhoun a hearty congratulations and are pleased to offer you free access to her winning article through the end of July.

About the Winner

Cheshire Calhoun
Cheshire Calhoun, winner of the Journal of Applied Philosophy 2015 Essay Prize

Currently, Dr. Cheshire Calhoun teaches philosophy at Arizona State University and is serving as chair of the American Philosophical Association (APA) board of officers. She previously edited feminist philosophy journal Hypatia, and was chair of the APA’s LGBT Committee and the Inclusiveness Committee.

The majority of her work falls within normative ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of emotion, feminist philosophy, and gay and lesbian philosophy.

To learn more about her prolific career and work, please visit her website.

 

 


About the Journal

The Journal of Applied Philosophy provides a unique forum for philosophical research which seeks to make a constructive contribution to problems of practical concern. Open to the expression of diverse viewpoints, the journal brings critical analysis to these areas and to the identification, justification and discussion of values of universal appeal. The journal covers a broad spectrum of issues in environment, medicine, science, policy, law, politics, economics and education. Go here to subscribe today.

Society for Applied Philosophy logo
The SAP’s new logo

The journal is run by the Society for Applied Philosophy. Founded in 1982, the society aims to promote philosophical study and research that has a direct bearing on areas of practical concern. To learn about the society’s work and how you can become a member, please visit its website.

Recap: American Philosophical Association Eastern Meeting 2016

This year’s APA Eastern meeting didn’t disappoint. From January 6-9th, philosophers flocked to chilly Washington, D.C. to actively further the study of philosophy in meetings, presentations, and receptions.

The Wiley Blackwell team was there to aid in that mission. We enjoyed meeting you and discussing anything and everything philosophy – from Hannah Arendt to dualism to how you can get published at Wiley. Thank you to those who came by to say hello!

We hope you were able to come by our booth to meet our editors, and to check out the latest in books and journals. If you weren’t able to make it – don’t worry! We’ll be at APA Pacific and look forward to seeing you there.

Until then, here’s our APA Eastern 2016 recap.

// Wednesday, Day 1

Our APA experience was kicked off with an afternoon APA Commmittee Session on “The Analytic Tradition and Chinese Philosophy”, co-chaired by Linyu Gu and Chung-Ying Cheng, both editors of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Six speakers were present to discuss questions such as, “Is philosophy culture-bound?” Heavy weights such as Gary Mar and Michael Beaney commentated.

The evening was chock-full of fascinating sessions, one of which was hosted by the International Society for Chinese Philosophy, the topic being “Unearthed Texts and Ancient Chinese Philosophy.” Again, esteemed editor Chung-ying Cheng served as chair. Eight speakers debated Zhuangzi, Laozi, Zisi, Mengzi, and more.

Just next door, the Society for Applied Philosophy hosted a session on “Current Ethical and Justice Issues in Higher Education”, chaired by Harry Brighouse. Speakers contemplated the place of the humanities in a liberal society, the future of philosophical research on higher education, and more, with Gina Schouten commentating. (For further reading on applied philosophy, please browse the Journal of Applied Philosophy.)

// Thursday, Day 2

Our second day at APA was all about Carol Gould, editor of the Journal of Social Philosophy. We hosted a “Meet the Editors” coffee and tea reception at our booth, where many stopped by to meet Carol, Josh Keton (also of the Journal of Social Philosophy), Marissa Koors (Wiley Blackwell books), and Fifile Nguyen (representing this very blog!). Philosophers from all career stages came by to chat about how to get published in our journals, books, and blog.

journal of social philosophy

Then, Carol rushed off to be awarded the APA’s 2015 Gittler Prize at the prize reception for her book Interactive Democracy: The Social Roots of Global Justice. Huge congratulations to Carol on this achievement. She truly is one of the world’s best thought leaders on justice and human rights.

At the same time, Wiley’s Marissa Koors participated in a publishing workshop, speaking about the publishing process via a Q&A with other leading publishers such as Cambridge University Press, De Gruyter, Routledge, and more. If you missed it, here are her top three tips on getting published:

  1.  It’s always a good idea to send a query to an editor before submitting your book proposal. The editor can often tell you directly if the book you’re writing is a good fit for their publishing program.
  2. Do some research into each publisher’s backlist in philosophy, and be able to argue why they are the best fit for your book where possible. You will stand out.
  3. High quality content will always speak for itself, regardless of the age or tenure status of its author.

The evening also featured a session by the International Society of Chinese Philosophy on “Confucianism and the Yijing”, again chaired by Chung-ying Cheng of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Nine speakers presented papers on sub-topics ranging from “Body and Sensation in Yijing Tradition” to comparing The Yijing to Ernst Cassirer’s Philosophy of Symbolic Forms.

// Friday, Day 3

Friday provided plenty of time for philosophers to roam the exhibit hall. Our booth featured key new books in philosophy from Wiley Blackwell, as well as our extensive philosophy journals portfolio. There was much interest around Bill Irwin’s latest book, The Free Market Existentialist: Capitalism without Consumerism:

free market existentialist.png

 

And, as always, copies of the latest issues in Wiley Blackwell philosophy journals were available for free:

journals APA.png

We also asked, “What you think is the future of philosophy?” We got some great entries – check them out in our next blog post!

That evening, the APA hosted a reception to fête its new blog, which will offer an inside look at the APA, job market advice, and more. Give it your support by reading it here.

// Saturday, Day 4

Our last day started off with a session hosted by the Society for Applied Philosophy on “Parental Rights and Responsibilities” chaired by Jake Earl and commentated by Colin Macleod. Three speakers discussed “regulating biological parenting”, “parents and dependent children”, and more.

We spent the last few hours of APA in the exhibit hall, selling books and giving away our last journal copies. Folks got their last chance to speak with our acquisitions editor, and then we closed up shop to make our way back to the Wiley office in Boston.

 

Journal of Applied Philosophy 2011 Article Prize Winner

The editors of the Journal of Applied Philosophy are pleased to announce the winner of the 2011 annual article prize. Congratulations to Jakob Elster who was awarded the £1000 prize for his article How Outlandish Can Imaginary Cases Be?

 The Journal of Applied Philosophy will continue to award an annual prize of £1000 to the best article published in the year’s volume. The judgement as to the best article will be made by the editors of the journal; the Society for Applied Philosophy annual lecture, published in the journal, will not be eligible for the prize of best article.

 

The Global Reach of Human Rights, Amartya Sen

Society for Applied Philosophy 2011 Annual Lecture

The Global Reach of Human Rights

Professor Amartya Sen

Tuesday 14 June 2011
5pm at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford
(Doors open from 4.30pm)

The lecture will be followed by a reception for Society for Applied Philosophy members. Further Information.

The Society for Applied Philosophy sponsors an Annual Lecture to be delivered by a philosopher who has made an important contribution to the field of applied philosophy broadly construed.

Listen to past lectures:

2010: Militant Modern Atheism, Professor Philip Kitcher

2009: Measuring Development, Poverty and Gender Equity, Professor Thomas Pogge

2008: Naturalism, Normativity, and Applied Ethics, Baroness Onora O’Neill (Inagural SAP Annual Lecture)

Free Podcast: “Militant Modern Atheism”

The 2010 Society for Applied Philosophy Annual Lecture “Militant Modern Atheism” was delivered by Professor Philip Kitcher (John Dewey Professor of Philosophy and James R. Barker Professor of Contemporary Civilization, Columbia University) on Friday 19 March 2010. In this podcast Professor Kitcher discusses his ideas with the Rt Revd Lord Richard Harries, former Bishop of Oxford, and Professor David Archard, Chair of the Society for Applied Philosophy. Listen to the SAP podcast of the interview with Professor Kitcher (34 minutes and 34 seconds; 39.73Mb).