American Philosophical Association Eastern- Virtual Issue 2019

By Elizabeth Levine

 

In January 2019, the American Philosophical Association will hold its Eastern meeting in New York City. In honor of the One Hundred and Fifteenth meeting, Wiley has compiled a free collection of the top cited articles in Philosophy from our publishing partners journals. This collection can be read by anyone until March 31st 2019.

Journal of Applied Philosophy

Resolving the Tensions Between White People’s Active Investment in Racial Inequality and White Ignorance: A Response to Marzia Milazzo

Theoria

Why Do Irrational Beliefs Mimic Science? The Cultural Evolution of Pseudoscience

Ratio

A Brief Argument For Consciousness Without Access

Mind & Language

The epistemic innocence of clinical memory distortions

Metaphilosophy

On the Philosophy of Bitcoin/Blockchain Technology: Is it a Chaotic, Complex System?

Dialetica

A Demonstration of the Causal Power of Absences

Bioethics

Empathy, social media, and directed altruistic living organ donation

Journal of Philosophy of Education

Can ‘Philosophy for Children’ Improve Primary School Attainment?

Hastings Center Report

Sequencing Newborns: A Call for Nuanced Use of Genomic Technologies

Hypatia

Tracking Privilege‐Preserving Epistemic Pushback in Feminist and Critical Race Philosophy Classes

History & Theory

THE ALLURE OF DARK TIMES: MAX WEBER, POLITICS, AND THE CRISIS OF HISTORICISM

Philosophical Issues

LOGICAL NIHILISM: COULD THERE BE NO LOGIC?*

Nous

Gettier Across Cultures

Philosophical Forum

Big Data and Transcendental Philosophy

The Southern Journal of Philosophy

Thinking in the Zone: The Expert Mind in Action

Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science

THE HUMAN BEING SHAPING AND TRANSCENDING ITSELF: WRITTEN LANGUAGE, BRAIN, AND CULTURE

Philosophy & Public Affairs

Future People, the Non‐Identity Problem, and Person‐Affecting Principles

Journal of Social Philosophy

Modeling Inclusive Pedagogy: Five Approaches

Analytic Philosophy

Real Definition

Journal of Chinese Philosophy

CONFUCIANISM AND UBUNTU: REFLECTIONS ON A DIALOGUE BETWEEN CHINESE AND AFRICAN TRADITIONS

 

 

Our top picks for APA Pacific 2016 – Are You Ready?

This year’s American Philosophical Association Pacific Division Meeting is drawing near. You’re likely combing through the program or app (yes, there’s an app!) squinting at the small font wishing you could split yourself in two in order to attend all the things you’d like AND be able to explore the beautiful city that is San Francisco.

We’re here to help. We’ve put together a list of our top picks – lectures, receptions, and more – to make sure you don’t miss out on any of the good stuff.

SF Haight Street

Day 1 // Wednesday

9am – noon

An Invited Symposium on Chinese Philosophy and Language will be chaired by recent Journal of Chinese Philosophy contributor Xinyan Jiang (University of Redlands).

Or, sit in on the APA Committee on Lectures, Publication, and Research, chaired by Louise Antony (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

If those don’t suit your fancy, we recommend attending the Book Symposium on Lori Gruen’s Entangled Empathy, chaired by Shelley Wilcox (San Francisco State University). Gruen (Wesleyan University) and Wilcox have both worked as editors of Hypatia.

noon – 1pm

Grab some lunch, then head over to the Wiley-Blackwell stand in the exhibit hall. We’re offering 20% off books (to take away or ship directly to you!), free copies of our renowned philosophy journals, and more. Say hello to our acquisitions editor and tell us what you think about the future of philosophy to get a $5 Starbucks gift card.

1 – 4pm

An Invited Symposium: Science and Pragmatism will be chaired by David Boersema (Pacific University). Boersema contributed to the recently published The Ultimate Star Trek and Philosophy: The Search for Socrates.

Also at this time, an APA Committee Session on The Moral Significance of Shame and
Disgust: Chinese and Western Perspectives will take place. Arranged by the APA Committee on the Status of Asian and Asian American Philosophers and Philosophies, this session is chaired by Justin Tiwald (San Francisco State University).

And, you may not want to miss the APA Committee Session on Trends in Brazilian Epistemology, arranged by the APA Committee on International Cooperation. This session is being chaired by Sven Bernecker (University of California, Irvine), author of the book Reading Epistemology: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary.

4-6 pm

There are several great options to spend your afternoon.

First, a Colloquium on Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism will be chaired for the first hour by Journal of Chinese Philosophy author Nathan Carson (Fresno Pacific University), then chaired by Robin Wang (Loyola Marymount University) for the last hour. Wang has contributed essays to Philosophy Compass (see here and here) and the Journal of Chinese Philosophy (see here and here).

Or, enjoy a lively debate organized by the North American Kant Society. An Author-Meets-Critics session featuring Henry Allison’s Kant’s Transcendental Deduction will be chaired by frequent Wiley philosphy contributor Lucy Allais (University of the Witwatersrand and University of California, San Diego). You can read her past work in the Winter 2008 issue of Philosophy and Public Affairs here and two of her essays featured in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research here and here.

Last but not least, we recommend the APA Committee Session on LGBT Metaphysics. Arranged by the APA Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and
Transgender People in the Profession, this session is chaired by Ásta Sveinsdóttir (San Francisco State University). Sveinsdóttir recently wrote about the role of feminism in naturalism in The Blackwell Companion to Naturalism.

6 – 9pm

If you’re still up for more, the Experimental Philosophy Society is hosting a session on Experimental Work in Formal Semantics, chaired by Philosophy Compass author Seth Yalcin (University of California, Berkeley).

Or, the International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy is hosting a session on Skepticism, Friendship, Perception, and Home: Views from Zhuangzi, Confucians, Montaigne, and Heidegger. This session is chaired by Eirik Lang Harris (City University of Hong Kong). Harris has contributed works to the Philosophy Compass and the Journal of Chinese Philosophy.

Our last pick in this timeslot is a session hosted by the Society for German Idealism. Chaired by Hypatia author Jeff Gauthier (University of Portland), this session will feature the presentation of papers such as, “Du Bois and Hegel on Social Freedom,” “Liberal Naturalism in the Post-Kantian Tradition,” and more.

Day 2 // Thursday

9am-noonpalmquist cover

Start your morning off right with a Book Symposium centered around Stephen Palmquist’s Comprehensive Commentary on Kant’s Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason, chaired by Robert Gressis (California State University, Northridge). See critics and author Palmquist (of Hong Kong Baptist University) discuss this new work, the first definitive, comprehensive commentary on Kant’s Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason.

Alternatively, we recommend the APA Committee Session on Justice in the City, arranged by the APA Committee on Public Philosophy. This session will be chaired by Shelley Wilcox (San Francisco State University).

noon – 1 pm

Don’t forget to stop by the Wiley-Blackwell booth in the exhibit hall! We’d love to chat with you about how you can be published in our journals. In fact, the European Journal of Philosophy is now publishing more pages in each issue – submit your paper ASAP.

1 – 4pm

Next, we recommend seeing the Invited Symposium on Post-Kantian Theories of concepts. Chaired by Mind & Language author Richard Zach (University of Calgary), we’re sure there will be lively discussion around papers such as, “Bolzano on Representations in Logic, Cognition, and Action,” and “The Abstractionist Theory of Concept Formation After Kant.”

Alternatively, observe the Invited Symposium on Women in the History of Philosophy of Religion. This session, chaired by Kristen Irwin (Loyola University Chicago), will debate papers such as, “17th Century Women on God’s Existence and Nature,” and the amusingly titled, “Medieval Women Didn’t Do Philosophy of Religion: So Why Am I Still Talking?” Irwin has contributed work to the Philosophy Compass.

4 – 5pm

Take a break at the Bay Area Feminism and Philosophy Reception taking place in the Italian Room at the Westin St. Francis. A selection of vegetarian canapés will be served, and everyone is welcome. This reception is made possible by the generosity of the Mortimer Fleishhacker Fund for Philosophy at the University of San Francisco.

4 – 6pm

We next recommend the Colloquium on Cognition and the Nature of Acts. Split into two, the first hour will be chaired by Journal of Social Philosophy contributor Jason Kawall (Colgate University), and discuss papers such as, “Knowledge in Action.” The second half of the session will be chaired by David Beglin (University of California, Riverside) and discuss the paper, “‘Philosophy of Action’ Is Not a Philosophy of Acts.”

Or, visit the session hosted by the Society for Philosophy of Creativity. There, you’ll discover a likely fascinating discussion on, “Why Does Art Matter? Reflections on an NEH Enduring Questions Grant,” chaired by Raymond D. Boisvert (Siena College). Boisvert has contributed pieces to The Southern Journal of Philosophy and Journal of Philosophy of Education.

6 – 9pm

The Society for Applied Philosophy is hosting an Author-Meets-Critics session featuring Leif Wenar’s Blood Oil: Tyruants, Violence, and the Rules That Run the World. Gillian Brock (University of Auckland) is chairing. (By the way, their February issue featuring a Singer and Kagan debate of speciesism is available now!)

For those interested in the philosophy of history, the Society for the Philosophy of History is hosting a session on “The Philosophy and Political Thought of Mark Bevir,” chaired by Robert Piercey (University of Regina). Piercey is a contributing author to the new A Companion to Hermeneutics.

We’re also looking forward to the session hosted by the Society

dr emily s lee

Image from the New York Times

 

for Women in Philosophy. There, “Confronting Racism and Violence: Philosophical Research and Teaching” will be chaired by Hypatia contributor Emily S. Lee (California State University, Fullerton). Papers discussed will include, “A New Paradigm of Anti-Racism: Why Discourses of White Privilege, Justice, and Equality Do Not Work,”, “The Revolution Will Not Be Journal(ized): Blogs, Op-eds, and Podcasts as Timely Philosophical Tools,” and more. This session is sure to be fascinating and timely.

8 – 10pm

The Society for the Philosophy of Human Rights is hosting a late evening session with several speakers: Elizabeth Ashford (University of St. Andrews), Adam Etinson (University of Chicago), Robert Simpson (Monash University), and James Nickel (University of Miami). Clearly this is to be a debate of the utmost relevance and is not to be missed!

10pm – midnight

Then, the APA Annual Reception will take place in the Colonial Ballroom (Mezzanine). Grab a glass or three, say hello to all your friends, and talk about what a wonderful time you’re having at the conference.

Day 3 // Friday

9am – noon

Start your morning off with Aristotle. A Colloquium on the Ethics and Politics in Aristotle will feature three parts. The first hour will cover “Aristotle’s Thumos as Dunamis and Pathos” and be chaired by Michael Ferejohn (Duke University), contributor to the Wiley-Blackwell A Companion to Plato. Hour two will be chaired by Bjorn Wastvedt (University of Arizona) and cover, “Aristotle’s Conception of the Political Life as an Imitation of the Divine.” Finally, the session will conclude with an hour discussing, “Aristotelian Sunaisthesis: A Synoptic View of Life” chaired by Emily Perry (University of California, Berkeley).

noon – 1pmbioethics cover

We invite you to stop by the Wiley-Blackwell table in the exhibitor’s hall. Leaf through the newest edition of Bioethics: An Anthology edited by Helga Kuhse, Udo Schuklenk, and Peter Singer.

1 – 4pm

Look no further than the Book Symposium on Duncan Pritchard’s Epistemic Angst: Radical Skepticism and the Groundlessness of Our Believing. This session will be chaired by Chienkuo Mi (Soochow University), with noted speakers such as Ram Neta (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Ernest Sosa (Rutgers University). Neta and Sosa are the esteemed editors of Noûs.

4 – 6pm

You won’t want to miss this year’s annual Dewey Lecture, chaired by editor of Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic Heather Battaly (California State University, Fullerton). Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma) will be speaking on “The Joys and Sorrows of Philosophy.” The reception will take place during the last thirty minutes.

 

7 – 10pm

Don’t miss the Society for Applied Philosophy’s second session, “Corruption and Accountability: Theory and Practice” chaired by Gillian Brock (University of Auckland). Subtopics to be discussed are “Corruption of Knowledge and the Pharmaceutical Industry,” “Think Tank Ethics: Theory Meets Practice,” and more.

Day 4 // Saturday

9am – noon

You’ll want to give yourself major kudos for having made it this far; you will surely be exhausted. Sleep in, get some breakfast – you’ll have earned it.

1 – 4pm

We’re excited about the Invited Symposium: Normativity of Meaning and Content. This session will be chaired by Kirk Ludwig (Indiana University Bloomington), editor of Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, and feature editors of Thought: A Journal of Philosophy Asa Wikforss (Stockholms Universitet) and Ralph Wedgwood (University of Southern) as speaker and commentator, respectively.

4 – 6pm

For your early evening, we recommend the Colloquium on Moral Normativity and Its Relation to Epistemic Normativity. The first half of this session will be chaired by Hypatia author Sharyn Clough (Oregon State University), and discuss, “Knowledge as Ability: A Constructive Critique.”

6 – 9pm

The International Society for Chinese Philosophy is hosting its second session on “Virtues, Roles, and Self-Cultivation in Confucianism”, and will discuss papers such as, “Agent and Deed in Confucian Thought” and more.

chris cuomoOr, see the International Society for Environmental Ethics’s second session chaired by Chris Cuomo (University of Georgia). Cuomo guest edited a special issue of Hypatia in 2014 on climate change. This session will debate environmental ethics, species extinction, and more.

8 – 10pm

Where did the time go? Stop by the Philosophy of Time Society’s session chaired by A Companion to the Philosophy of Time editor Adrian Bardon (Wake Forest University). Ask yourself, “Does It Really Seem to Us That Time Passes?” (A real paper title to be presesnted by Natalja Deng of University of Cambridge.)

Day 5 // Sunday

9am – 6:30pm

Still wanting more philosophy? ArtSense Taste and Community project have organized open workshops that will analyze how cultural artifacts acquire meaning and value as an example of the process by which communities establish shared terms of reference.

We asked you: What is the future of philosophy?

APA Philosophy Future Poster I v2

At this year’s APA Eastern Meeting, we asked you, “What you think is the future of philosophy?” and “What questions you might have for your peers?” Here’s what some of you had to say.


 

“The future of philosophy ought to be a more systematic engagement with the problems, challenges, and possibilities of globalized civilization – critically analyzing and constructively envisioning of the collective and sustainable future of humanity.”
David Sprintzen, Long Island University

Philosophy is fated to disappear, unless people will rediscover its value. But what is its value today? To ask, ‘what is its value’ is not the same as to ask ‘what is its use’. Or is it?”
– Anonymous

 “The discipline will continue to investigate itself – historically and demographically. More critical race and gender. More inclusive and more diverse styles of writing and topics.”
Storm Heter, East Stroudsburg University

I think that philosophy study will incorporate more from the sciences (natural and social sciences). But what exactly do philosophers make use of science requires more thinking.”
– Anonymous

“The future of philosophy will depend on the ability of philosophers and humanists to demonstrate the necessity of humanities and critical thought to a democratic society.”
Kevin Jobe, Morgan State University

“Since the Cold War, Philosophy has been separated from the Political World. The future will be the cooperation between the two worlds.”
– Anonymous

“The future is what philosophers must take seriously – expansion of applied philosophical dialogue with other disciplines – What is the value of philosophy in public space?”
John M. Abbarno, D’Youville College

“Content wise: smaller more focused work analog to normal science. Format wise: online books/articles”
– Anonymous


Missed your chance at APA Eastern? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below!


Read more: here’s a post from 2011 where Matti Eklund discusses Trends in Philosophy.

And, browse our philosophy journals free for 30 days online by visiting wileyonlinelibrary.com and using code APA2016.

 

Recap: American Philosophical Association Eastern Meeting 2016

This year’s APA Eastern meeting didn’t disappoint. From January 6-9th, philosophers flocked to chilly Washington, D.C. to actively further the study of philosophy in meetings, presentations, and receptions.

The Wiley Blackwell team was there to aid in that mission. We enjoyed meeting you and discussing anything and everything philosophy – from Hannah Arendt to dualism to how you can get published at Wiley. Thank you to those who came by to say hello!

We hope you were able to come by our booth to meet our editors, and to check out the latest in books and journals. If you weren’t able to make it – don’t worry! We’ll be at APA Pacific and look forward to seeing you there.

Until then, here’s our APA Eastern 2016 recap.

// Wednesday, Day 1

Our APA experience was kicked off with an afternoon APA Commmittee Session on “The Analytic Tradition and Chinese Philosophy”, co-chaired by Linyu Gu and Chung-Ying Cheng, both editors of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Six speakers were present to discuss questions such as, “Is philosophy culture-bound?” Heavy weights such as Gary Mar and Michael Beaney commentated.

The evening was chock-full of fascinating sessions, one of which was hosted by the International Society for Chinese Philosophy, the topic being “Unearthed Texts and Ancient Chinese Philosophy.” Again, esteemed editor Chung-ying Cheng served as chair. Eight speakers debated Zhuangzi, Laozi, Zisi, Mengzi, and more.

Just next door, the Society for Applied Philosophy hosted a session on “Current Ethical and Justice Issues in Higher Education”, chaired by Harry Brighouse. Speakers contemplated the place of the humanities in a liberal society, the future of philosophical research on higher education, and more, with Gina Schouten commentating. (For further reading on applied philosophy, please browse the Journal of Applied Philosophy.)

// Thursday, Day 2

Our second day at APA was all about Carol Gould, editor of the Journal of Social Philosophy. We hosted a “Meet the Editors” coffee and tea reception at our booth, where many stopped by to meet Carol, Josh Keton (also of the Journal of Social Philosophy), Marissa Koors (Wiley Blackwell books), and Fifile Nguyen (representing this very blog!). Philosophers from all career stages came by to chat about how to get published in our journals, books, and blog.

journal of social philosophy

Then, Carol rushed off to be awarded the APA’s 2015 Gittler Prize at the prize reception for her book Interactive Democracy: The Social Roots of Global Justice. Huge congratulations to Carol on this achievement. She truly is one of the world’s best thought leaders on justice and human rights.

At the same time, Wiley’s Marissa Koors participated in a publishing workshop, speaking about the publishing process via a Q&A with other leading publishers such as Cambridge University Press, De Gruyter, Routledge, and more. If you missed it, here are her top three tips on getting published:

  1.  It’s always a good idea to send a query to an editor before submitting your book proposal. The editor can often tell you directly if the book you’re writing is a good fit for their publishing program.
  2. Do some research into each publisher’s backlist in philosophy, and be able to argue why they are the best fit for your book where possible. You will stand out.
  3. High quality content will always speak for itself, regardless of the age or tenure status of its author.

The evening also featured a session by the International Society of Chinese Philosophy on “Confucianism and the Yijing”, again chaired by Chung-ying Cheng of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Nine speakers presented papers on sub-topics ranging from “Body and Sensation in Yijing Tradition” to comparing The Yijing to Ernst Cassirer’s Philosophy of Symbolic Forms.

// Friday, Day 3

Friday provided plenty of time for philosophers to roam the exhibit hall. Our booth featured key new books in philosophy from Wiley Blackwell, as well as our extensive philosophy journals portfolio. There was much interest around Bill Irwin’s latest book, The Free Market Existentialist: Capitalism without Consumerism:

free market existentialist.png

 

And, as always, copies of the latest issues in Wiley Blackwell philosophy journals were available for free:

journals APA.png

We also asked, “What you think is the future of philosophy?” We got some great entries – check them out in our next blog post!

That evening, the APA hosted a reception to fête its new blog, which will offer an inside look at the APA, job market advice, and more. Give it your support by reading it here.

// Saturday, Day 4

Our last day started off with a session hosted by the Society for Applied Philosophy on “Parental Rights and Responsibilities” chaired by Jake Earl and commentated by Colin Macleod. Three speakers discussed “regulating biological parenting”, “parents and dependent children”, and more.

We spent the last few hours of APA in the exhibit hall, selling books and giving away our last journal copies. Folks got their last chance to speak with our acquisitions editor, and then we closed up shop to make our way back to the Wiley office in Boston.