In Memoriam: Abner Shimony (1928-2015)

AbnerWe are sorry to hear of the passing of Dr. Abner Shimony, noted American physicist and philosopher of science.

Having earned a doctorate in philosophy from Yale University and a doctorate of physics from Princeton University, Dr. Shimony was a professor emeritus at Boston University and leaves behind a lifetime of work investigating the connections between physics and philosophy. Dr. Shimony also served in the U.S. Army’s Signal Corp of Engineers.

A detailed obituary and service information can be found here.

To honor Dr. Shimony’s life, we have made free a small collection of his work.


 

Introduction

Dialectica | Volume 39, Issue 2, June 1985

 

Concluding Remarks

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences | Volume 480, New Techniques and Ideas in Quantum Measurement Theory, December 1986

 

On Martin Eger’s “A Tale of Two Controversies”

Zygon | Volume 23, Issue 3, September 1988

 

Degree of Entanglement

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences | Volume 755, Fundamental Problems in Quantum Theory, April 1995

 

Multipath Interferometry of the Biphoton*

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences | Volume 755, Fundamental Problems in Quantum Theory, April 1995

 

The Concept and Practice of Dialogue in Martin Eger’s Philosophy

The Philosophical Forum | Volume 39, Issue 4, Winter 2008

 

*Written by Michael Horne and Abner Shimony

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Interview: Who Owns You? The Corporate Gold Rush to Patent Your Genes

Surely you own your own genes, don’t you? Think again. Presently, more than one-fifth of the human genome is fully patented. Corporations and universities now own the exclusive rights to many precious parts of you. We spoke to David R. Koepsell, author of Who Owns You? The Corporate Gold Rush to Patent Your Genes about what led him to write about the realities and implications of gene patenting.

Philosopher’s Eye: Why did you decide to write Who Owns You?

David Koepsell: One of my major research topics over the years has been the philosophical aspects of intellectual property. My first book, The Ontology of Cyberspace (Open Court 2000) explored the nature of IP in computerized media. I had been doing some reading on the Human Genome Project and was astounded to learn that genes had begun to be patented during the HGP, and well afterwards. Continue reading “Interview: Who Owns You? The Corporate Gold Rush to Patent Your Genes”