LGBTQ Awareness & Education

Rounding out LGBTQ Pride Month, our final week is dedicated to LGBTQ Awareness & Education. We’ve unlocked a curated selection of research articles, which covers a wide array of topics such as intersectionality, gender identity, institutional inclusion, etc.

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Rounding out LGBTQ Pride Month, our final week is dedicated to LGBTQ Awareness & Education. We’ve unlocked a curated selection of research articles, which covers a wide array of topics such as intersectionality, gender identity, and institutional inclusion.

Enjoy this research freely through July 31, and don’t forget to comment and share below. Thanks for joining us as we continue the necessary conversation on LGBTQ rights, awareness, and support.


The importance of feeling sexually attractive: Can it predict an individual’s experience of their sexuality and sexual relationships across gender and sexual orientation? International Journal of Psychology | Early View

Complicating Counterspaces: Intersectionality and the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival.  American Journal of Community Psychology | May 2016

Helping Gay and Lesbian Students Integrate Sexual and Religious Identities Journal of College Counseling | April 2016

Queering women, peace and security International Affairs | March 2016

Thriving and Adapting: Resilience, Sense of Community, and Syndemics among Young Black Gay and Bisexual Men American Journal of Community Psychology | March 2016

Educators’ Reports on Incidence of Harassment and Advocacy Toward LGBTQ Students Psychology in the Schools | February 2016

LGBT Populations in Studies of Urban Neighborhoods: Making the Invisible Visible City & Community | September 2015

Inclusive Classrooms for LGBTQ Students Using Linked Text Sets to Challenge the Hegemonic “Single Story” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy| July/August 2015

Social Support Networks for LGBT Young Adults: Low Cost Strategies for Positive Adjustment Family Relations | July 2015

Extending Training in Multicultural Competencies to Include Individuals Identifying as Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual: Key Choice Points for Clinical Psychology Training Programs Clinical Psychology Science and Practice | June 2015

Gender, Naming, and Fluidity Dialog | June 2015

Quality LGBT Health Education: A Review of Key Reports and Webinars Clinical Psychology Science and Practice | June 2015

Toward Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating LGBT Cultural Competence for Psychologists Clinical Psychology Science and Practice | June 2015

My Soul to Take: A Phenomenology of the Struggle for an Authentic Gay Spirituality Counseling and Values | April 2015

LGBTQ Activist Organizations as ‘Respectably Queer’ in India: Contesting a Western View Gender, Work & Organization | January 2015

Medicine and Making Sense of Queer Lives Hastings Center Report | September 2014

Health Disparities among LGBT Older Adults and the Role of Nonconscious Bias Hastings Center Report | September 2014

‘Discourses of Desire:  Religion, Same-Sex Love and Secularisation in Britain, 1870-1930’ Gender & History | August 2014

Suicide Risk among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Military Personnel and Veterans: What Does the Literature Tell Us? Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior | April 2014

An Epistemology of Collusion:  Hijras, Kothis and the Historical (Dis)continuity of Gender/Sexual Identities in Eastern India Gender & History | November 2012

Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Paganism Religion Compass | August 2012

Queer Systems: The Benefits of a More Systematic Approach to Queer Theology CrossCurrents | March 2011

Gay Asian Masculinities and Christian Theologies CrossCurrents | January 2011

Epistemic Modernity and the Emergence of Homosexuality in China Gender & History | November 2010

Is it a choice? Sexual orientation as interpretation Journal of Social Philosophy | February 2009


Just joining us for LGBTQ Pride Month? Catch up on the original content and curated collections that we’ve released so far!

495559275_fd6961c670_bInterview : Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth

 

 

Trans Issues Special Collection: Trans Issues

 

 

People are people. And family is family. On Identity, Pride, and Coming Out- A Personal Essay

 

 

LGBT Family Special Collection: LGBTQ Family & Relationships

 

 

LGBTQ Rights Special Collection: LGBTQ Rights

The Facebook Scandal that Wasn’t – By Udo Schuklenk

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Udo Schuklenk

PNAS, the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published on June 24, 2014 the results of a study involving Facebook (FB) users. The authors wanted to ‘test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed.’ The researchers investigated this question by manipulating the newsfeeds of a few hundred thousand randomly selected FB users. Some received more positive messages, and some received more negative messages. The identities of these users were not known to the researchers in question. FB permitted social scientists to mess with some of their users’ brains for the purposes of a research project. It’s something that FB does frequently. The contents of its news-feeds are manipulated all the time, its algorithms changed often. FB users have agreed to this since 2012 when they signed up to a user agreement for the free service stating:

… we may use the information we receive about you … for internal operations, including troubleshooting, data analysis, testing, research and service improvement.’

For reasons I still fail to understand fully, some high-profile US bioethicists came out in the typical fashion bioethicists have become notorious for – expressing outrage in various forms and shapes about the supposedly unethical nature of the study. My esteemed colleague Robert Klitzman, for instance, described the study as ‘scandalous’.

My own view of the study is that it isn’t scandalously unethical, even though it would have been better had the research participants been informed about being targeted for research purposes. It seems absurd to me that there are no complaints from these ethicists if FB does exactly the same thing (manipulating its news-feed algorithms to change its users – mine for crying out loud! – state of mind while we use their service). However, grandiose hand waving is triggered if researchers do the same in order to address important research questions. From a consequentialist perspective, this doesn’t make a great deal of sense. More than that, we FB users are informed that ‘information we receive about you’ may be used for ‘testing’ and ‘research.’ Bioethicist Art Caplan, meanwhile, thinks that telling us that we might be subjected to research projects is insufficient for us to truly comprehend that we might be subjected to research projects. Really!

Well, to cut a long story short, Michelle Meyer and other bioethicists – myself included – came together to pen a response to our outraged colleagues, defending the research in question. Nature, of all publications, took our commentary. Check it out some time, be it just to reassure yourself that bioethicists aren’t all about seeing scandal and problems in every corner of the universe. Since we wrote our piece, a number of bioethicists, including Dan Brock, Peter Singer, Dan Wikler and others have signed on to our statement.

Let the debate begin.

The Future of Philosophy: ‘Information First’ By Luciano Floridi

The following opinion piece is one of a series of five being released this week and next to celebrate World Philosophy Day and to publicise the upcoming workshop entitled Editor’s Cut – A view of philosophical research from journal editors. the workshop will take place at the University of London on Friday 13th of January 2012.

Information First
By Luciano Floridi
Professor of Philosophy and UNESCO Chair in Information and Computer Ethics, University of Hertfordshire
 & Oxford University
Editor of Philosophy & Technology

On 23rd of April 2010, Bill Gates gave a talk at MIT in which he asked: “are the brightest minds working on the most important problems?” By “the most important problems” he meant “improving the lives of the poorest; improving education, health, nutrition”. Unfortunately, the list should probably include improving peaceful interactions, human rights, environmental conditions, living standards… and this is only the beginning. Clearly, the brightest philosophical minds should not be an exception, but turn their attention to such pressing challenges. The first question is how. Of course, one may stop philosophising and start doing something about this messy world instead. We may, in other words, close down our philosophy departments and never corrupt our brightest youths philosophically. Yet, such solution smacks of self-defeat. It would be like deciding to burn the wicker basket in which we are travelling, because our hot air balloon is descending too quickly. Philosophy is what you want to keep in a good world, not what you want to get rid of in a bad one. So there must be a different way forward. The fact is that philosophy can be extremely helpful, for it is philosophy, understood as conceptual design, that forges the new ideas, theories, perspectives and more generally the intellectual framework that can then be used to understand and deal with the ultimate questions that challenge us so pressingly. In the team effort made by the brightest minds, the philosophical ones can contribute insights and visions, analyses and syntheses, heuristics and solutions that can empower us to tackle the most important problems. Every little effort helps in the battle against idiocy, obscurantism, intolerance, fanaticisms and fundamentalisms of all kinds, bigotry, prejudice and mere ignorance. If this sounds self-serving recall that Continue reading “The Future of Philosophy: ‘Information First’ By Luciano Floridi”

The Future of Philosophy: IPAD – Information Processing and the Analysis of Democracy by Vincent F. Hendricks

The following opinion piece is one of a series of five being released this week and next to celebrate World Philosophy Day and to publicise the upcoming workshop entitled Editor’s Cut – A view of philosophical research from journal editors. the workshop will take place at the University of London on Friday 13th of January 2012.

IPAD – Information Processing and the Analysis of Democracy
A research program for interdisciplinary philosophy

Vincent F. Hendricks
University of Copenhagen and Columbia University
Editor of Synthese

Useful philosophy is seldom pure philosophy. It is rather philosophy mixed with something else, in order to solve some pertinent, conceptual or practical problems. Philosophical research for the future is an essentially interdisciplinary enterprise, involving scholars from a good spread of disciplines ranging from humanities over social science to natural science and technology.

An example: “democracy”. Among political philosophers the concept of democracy has Continue reading “The Future of Philosophy: IPAD – Information Processing and the Analysis of Democracy by Vincent F. Hendricks”

The Future of Philosophy: ‘Whither Philosophy?’ By Robert Stern

The following opinion piece is one of a series of five being released this week and next to celebrate World Philosophy Day and to publicise the upcoming workshop entitled Editor’s Cut – A view of philosophical research from journal editors. the workshop will take place at the University of London on Friday 13th of January 2012.

Whither Philosophy?
By Robert Stern
Professor of Philosophy, University of Sheffield
Editor of the European Journal of Philosophy

The story goes that when the Chinese premier Zhou Enlai was asked in the early 1970s about the effects of the French Revolution, he replied with sage-like wisdom that it is ‘Too early to tell’. Likewise, in being asked ‘what currents in contemporary philosophy will shape the future of the discipline?’, it is tempting to hide behind Zhou Enlai’s caution, and respond similarly. Moreover, even if one feels he was being unduly pessimistic about the question when applied to the French Revolution, he may still seem wise if instead he thought he was being asked about the student revolts of 1968 a mere three years before – as is now claimed. Futurology is a notoriously dangerous pursuit, likely to make its proponents look foolish.

Nonetheless, it perhaps seems likely that certain trends and issues in Continue reading “The Future of Philosophy: ‘Whither Philosophy?’ By Robert Stern”

No Conservatives, Please

Are the social sciences ‘too liberal’? At least one professor of psychology thinks so. Addressing those present at a conference of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, University of Virginia psychologist Jonathan Haidt described what he identified to be the ‘liberal bias’ both within his own discipline of social psychology as well as within the social sciences and humanities in general. Haidt, who specialises in the intuitive foundations of morality and ideology, asked audience members to identify their political affiliation by show of hand. Of the thousand or so people present, an estimated 80% identified as liberals, while only three conservative Continue reading “No Conservatives, Please”

Virtual Worlds: A Social Experiment of Real Value

Ludlow's dual life
Ludlow's dual life

Yesterday, Peter Ludlow opened the second week of the 2009 Compass Interdisciplinary Virtual Conference with a riveting presentation on virtual communities, cultures and governance. This year’s conference is titled ‘Breaking Down Barriers.’ Accordingly, Ludlow takes us into the virtual world of Second Life and provides a glimpse of how individuals, from a standpoint of anonymity, nonetheless construct communities, cultures, and even forms of governance that resolve inevitable conflicts.

Second Life is the height of embedded social networking. It is a platform where people can assume any identity they wish by constructing a highly customizable avatar. The content of the virtual world is also completely user designed. Players construct objects, buildings, business establishments, and much more. Each player travels through the virtual world as his avatar, and can engage with, modify, and construct, various objects, and most importantly can interact with the avatars of other players.

These interactions create various communities. Ludlow defines a virtual community as a group of individuals spatially separated but engaged in a broad range of shared social activities through non-face-to-face forms of communication. A community might form around a virtual night-club; regularly meeting at the same spot and intensively interacting. Or, a community might form around a business venture, for example, constructing a new virtual night-club. The opportunities for interaction within Second Life are plenty. And, as in the real world, these interactions provide the basis for enduring relationships, friendships, alliances, but also enmities.

Continue reading “Virtual Worlds: A Social Experiment of Real Value”