Happy World Philosophy Day!

November 19, 2015 is the tenth World Philosophy Day. Join us by reading curated Wiley scholarly works on philosophy, then in dialog on Twitter @PhilosophersEye or in the comments section.

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November 19th marks the tenth annual World Philosophy Day. Established by UNESCO in 2005, this day calls to attention “the enduring value of philosophy for the development of human thought, for each culture and for each individual.”

In conjunction with UNESCO’s roundtable debate on plurality of languages and places of philosophy, we’ve organized a special collection of philosophical scholarship from our wide portfolio of journals, free to read for 30 days.

Please read and share, then join us in dialog on Twitter @PhilosophersEye.  

 

World Philosophy Day Twitter image


 

Topic 1 // Philosophy in Non-Western Cultures

Knowledge and dissemination of philosophical thought of non-Western cultures, especially through new technologies.

Emerging Technologies and the Future of Philosophy by Philippe Verdoux

Metaphilosophy

 

Gettier Across Cultures by Edouard Machery, Stephen Stich, David Rose, Amita Chatterjee, Kaori Karasawa, Noel Struchiner, Smita Sirker, Naoki Usui, and Takaaki Hashimoto

Noûs

 

Aristotelian Casuistry: Getting into the Thick of Global Media Ethics by Sandra L. Borden
Communication Theory

Logicality and Regulatory Ethics: Lessons from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project by Joseph J. Fins, The Hastings Center Report

 

Topic 2 //Philosophy Beyond the Desk

Philosophy outside of the academic enclosure, using new places and formats.

 

Race, Religion, and Ethics in the Modern/Colonial World by Nelson Maldonado-Torres

Journal of Religious Ethics

 

Josef Fuchs’ Revised Natural Law: Possibilities for Social Ethics by James P. O’Sullivan

New Blackfriars

 

Renegotiating Aquinas: Catholic Feminist Ethics, Postmodernism, Realism, and Faith by Lisa Sowle Cahill

Journal of Religious Ethics

 

On Cultivating the Courage to Speak Up: The Critical Role of Attendings in the Moral Development of Physicians in Training by Divya Yerramilli

The Hastings Center Report

 

Topic 3 // Reimagining Philosophical Learning

The variety of places and forms of teaching and learning philosophy.

 

Teaching an Introduction to the Global Philosophy of Religion by Nathan Loewen

Teaching Theology & Religion

 

Heidegger, Education and the ‘Cult of the Authentic’ by Ben Trubody

Journal of Philosophy of Education

 

Pedagogy of the Impossible: Žižek in the Classroom by Chris McMillan

Educational Theory

 

Teaching Bioethics at the Secondary School Level by Laura J. Bishop and Lola Szobota

The Hastings Center Report


Ancient Philosophy

Want more philosophy?

Read the first Virtual Issue on Ancient Philosophy from the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies – now available for free.

A Special Collection on Holocaust Distortion and Muslim-Jewish Relations

In light of the most recent World Zionist Congress meeting and the on-going Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the Middle East, we have curated a special collection focusing on the significance of Muslim-Jewish relations as they pertain to Holocaust Distortion and Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia.

muslim jewish relations

By freeing the content now through November 30, we hope to facilitate an impactful conversation on religion, culture, ethics, and history to better relations and build effective policy.

Update

To further the conversation on Muslim-Jewish relations, we’ve created a book giveaway! To enter to win Peacemaking and the Challenge of Violence in World Religions, follow the instructions below. Retweet any of tweets with the contest graphic from the following Wiley accounts: @WileyReligion, @PhilosophersEye, and @WileyHistory. The contest ends Friday, Nov 6.

Twitter Contest Graphic

Click here for more information on the book.


Journal of Religious Ethics on Holocaust Distortion

Journal of Religious Ethics
Volume 43, Issue 4, December 2015

Holocaust Abuse: The Case of Hajj Muhammad Amin al-Husayni

Michael A. Sells

Abstract: This essay reconsiders the category of “Holocaust denial” as the marked indicator of ethical transgression in Holocaust historiography within American civil religion. It maintains that the present category excludes and thereby enables other violations of responsible Holocaust historiography. To demonstrate the nature and gravity of such violations, the essay engages the widespread claim that Hajj Muhammad Amin al-Husayni, the former mufti of Jerusalem, was an instigator, promoter, or “driving spirit” of the Nazi genocide against Jews, and the associated suggestions of wider Arab and Muslim complicity. The essay uncovers the history of the Husayni narrative in question, the dramatic circumstances in which it emerged, its role in the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann, and its rediscovery and misuse within American popular and political circles over the past two decades. Such misuse, it concludes, corrodes Holocaust recognition within American civil religion and demonstrates the need for a revision of the socially accepted ethical boundary for responsible Holocaust historiography.

Response to Michael Sells

Ronald M. Green

Abstract: In an era when lies and misrepresentations about historical events easily become firmly rooted, Michael Sells’s discussion illustrates the importance of careful historical research as a moral enterprise. In addition to the skills of the historian, however, there is also room in this enterprise for those of the ethicist. In particular, I warn against confusing the truth or falsity of claims about one narrow historical period with larger questions about the moral meaning and significance of those claims. Illustrating this, I argue one cannot assess the legitimacy of competing nationhood claims solely on the basis of the deeds of specific actors. Nor should the actions of a single individual like the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem be converted into a totalizing claim about the rights of the Palestinian people.

CrossCurrents Special Issue on Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia: Probing the History and Dynamics of Hate

CrossCurrents
Special Issue on Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia Volume 65, Issue 3, September 2015

Introduction: Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia—Twins or Category Mistake?

Guest Editor: Björn Krondorfer

 

Sticks and Stones: The Role of Law in the Dynamics of Hate

David Kader

Renewed Hate: The Place of Jews and Muslims in Contemporary White Power Thought

Richard King

Making Enemies: The Uses and Abuses of Tainted Identities

Alex Alvarez

Islamophobia and Anti-Semitism: Shared Prejudice or Singular Social Pathologies

Michael Dobkowski

Classifying Muslims

Mohamed Mosaad Abdelaziz Mohamed

Nostalgia and Memory in Jewish–Muslim Encounters

Mehnaz M. Afridi

Shifting Hierarchies of Exclusion: Colonialism, Anti-Semitism, and Islamophobia in European History

Ethan B. Katz

Outlawing the Veil, Banning the Muslim? Restricting Religious Freedom in France

Melanie Adrian

When the Victims are not so Innocent: Extremist Muslim Activity in Western Bloc Countries

Khaleel Mohammed

The Nexus of Enmity: Ideology, Global Politics, and Identity in the Twenty-First Century

Eyal Bar

 

Interview: In the Name of God – The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence

John Teehan is the author of In the Name of God: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence, and has published and lectured widely on the impact of evolutionary theories on moral philosophy. In this comprehensive interview, John talks in depth about some of the themes in his book: how our moral minds may have been shaped by evolution, and how such a perspective can inform upon our understanding of religious violence.

Philosopher’s Eye: Why did you decide to write ‘In the Name of God: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence’?

John Teehan: I’ve always been deeply interested in the study of morality.  Not simply in terms of what we ought to do, how we ought  to live—although those are essential questions—but also in terms of why do  we have the values we have, how do moral traditions develop. This lead me into a study of moral psychology, and in particular evolutionary psychology. If we want to understand how we got where we are today in terms of morality, then trying to understand the origins of moral behaviour seemed to be Continue reading “Interview: In the Name of God – The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Ethics and Violence”