Interview : Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth

In an original podcast, Wiley’s Senior Marketing Manager Kathleen Mulcahy interviews Orvis School of Nursing’s Dr. Christine Aramburu Alegría on her clinical practice article titled, “Gender nonconforming and transgender children/youth: Family, community, and implications for practice,” published in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

For this week of LGBTQ Pride Month, we continue our thematic exploration in Trans Issues. In an original podcast, Wiley’s Senior Marketing Manager Kathleen Mulcahy interviews Orvis School of Nursing’s Dr. Christine Aramburu Alegría on her clinical practice article titled, “Gender nonconforming and transgender children/youth: Family, community, and implications for practice,” published in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. Along with podcast, we have also included a transcript below.

Earlier this week we released a free collection of research articles related to a variety of transgender and gender nonconforming topics, Dr. Aramburu Alegría’s article is among this collection.

Don’t forget to come back each Monday as we post articles and think pieces from Wiley authors and LGBTQ advocates centered around a unique theme. Thanks for joining us as we continue the necessary conversation on LGBTQ rights, awareness, and support.


 


Podcast Transcript

Continue reading “Interview : Patient Practice for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Youth”

The End of Reparative Therapy

50 Great Myths of Human Sexuality
50 Great Myths of Human Sexuality

With the removal of homosexuality as a mental illness in the 1970’s came a change in how therapists treated gay, lesbian, and bisexual patients. Instead of attempting to change a patient’s sexual orientation, experts were told to help them understand it and learn to cope in what was still a very homophobic society.
When mental health professionals changed, however, religious organizations picked up the mantle and started ministries dedicated to “reparative” therapy. Their members—who were sometimes referred to as ex-gays—went through programs that varied from independent bible study to aversion therapy, which involved administering electric shocks every time a patient became aroused by gay pornography.
These groups were very vocal for a few decades and lent their support to efforts to discriminate against LGBTQ individuals; they argued against teaching about sexual orientation in schools, fought the formation of gay-straight alliances, opposed marriage equality, and worked to prevent LGBTQ individuals from adopting children.
Their arguments were all grounded in the idea that sexual orientation could change, that people didn’t have to be gay. Ex-gays were paraded around as success stories—such as in a 1998 ad that insisted men could “pray away the gay.”
And then the truth began to come out. Some leaders of this movement were caught having homosexual affairs, visiting gay bars, or meeting men online. Others stepped forward to admit they were wrong, that they are still gay, and that sexual orientation does not change. In 2013, Exodus International—one of the largest and at one point most powerful, ex-gay ministries—shut its doors.
Now, in the United States at least, it looks like the time of reparative therapy has passed. The courts have held up laws in two states banning the practice for minors. The White House came out against it. And two Democratic Senators recently introduced a resolution condemning it.
But probably the best sign that its days are numbered come in the apologies from those who once sang its praises. Like these words from Exodus’ last president Alan Chambers: “I am sorry that some of you spent years working through the shame and guilt you felt when your attractions didn’t change….  I am sorry that there were times I didn’t stand up to people publicly “on my side” who called you names like sodomite—or worse.”

Martha Kempner, 2015.
Martha Kempner is co-author with Pepper Schwartz of 50 Great Myths of Human Sexuality published 2015 by Wiley