Scholarly Content on the Impact of 9/11

Navy videographer at Ground Zero

In the 10 years since the events of September 2001 a vast amount of scholarly research has been written on the impact of 9/11. Wiley-Blackwell is pleased to share with you this collection of free book and journal content, featuring over 20 book chapters and 185 journal articles from over 200 publications, spanning subjects across the social sciences and humanities.

Simply click on your area of interest below to access this reading and learning resource today:

Accounting & Finance

Anthropology, History & Sociology

Business & Management

Communication & Media Studies

Economics

Geography, Development & Urban Studies

Law

Literature, Language & Linguistics

Philosophy

Politics & International Relations

Psychology

Religion & Theology

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How to Beat Stress if You’re a Philosophy Graduate

This guest post is contributed by Anna Miller, who writes for online degree. She welcomes comments at: anna.miller009@gmail.com

Image: innoxiuss (Flickr)

If you’re a student of philosophy or thinking of majoring in the subject, you probably know how it feels to be at the receiving end of pitying or scornful looks. You may not mind so much because you wanted to study this major or because it was the only choice you had that was financially and otherwise viable. But if you’re stressed over worries about your future employability, here’s how you can shrug off the tension and look forward to a bright future:

  • Think ahead: Even though it’s not a major that many would choose today, philosophy is still a discipline that’s going strong in many colleges and universities. And although it may seem like it’s out of the running (what with engineering and management pushing it to the back seat), most people don’t realize that philosophy graduates are enjoying their moment in the sun with fields that require analytical reasoning snapping them up as soon as they graduate or within six months of graduation. In particular, the disciplines that prefer to employ philosophy graduates are finance, property development, business and research, health and social work, sales and retail, management and administration, manufacturing, catering, and even personal services (see below for a full list). Continue reading “How to Beat Stress if You’re a Philosophy Graduate”

On the Naughty Step, Mr Brown…

This week’s political headlines in the UK have been dominated by the emergence on Sunday of reports that a number of staff working at No.10 Downing Street in the office of the Prime Minister had contacted the National Bullying Helpline in response to treatment by their employer. Alongside these reports, the media has widely covered stories recounted in the book of political commentator Andrew Rawnsley, who describes a number of incidents involving Mr Brown, his staff, and apparently toys being thrown out of prams.

Despite Gordon Brown’s temper already being well-known, political debate has, quite predictably in an election year, focussed on the potential for character assassination of the PM. Continue reading “On the Naughty Step, Mr Brown…”

Virtual Conference Report: Day Four (22 Oct, 2009)

800px-COP14_11by Paula Bowles

The conference today has taken on a distinctly environmental feel. First up was Mark Macklin’s (University of Wales, Aberystwyth) keynote address entitled ‘Floodplain Catastrophes and Climate Change: Lessons from the Rise and Fall of Riverine Societies.’ In his paper, Macklin observes that ‘[w]e are not the first society to face the threat of environmental catastrophe,’ although he stresses that the current threat has unique features.

Susan Morrison (Texas State University – San Marcos) has taken a highly interdisciplinary approach to her paper ‘Waste Studies ‐ A New Paradigm for Literary Analysis, Something is Rotten in the Denmark of Beowulf and Hamlet’. By combining the disciplines of literature and waste studies, Morrison offers a reminder ‘that the origins of the Anglophone literary canon are sedimented in waste’.

Tim Cooper (University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus) continued this theme of waste with his paper ‘Recycling Modernity: Towards an Environmental History of Waste.’ By taking as a starting point the belief that ‘waste was one of the characteristic products of modernity’ Cooper is able to consider why this subject is so fascinating to historians and other social scientists.

Before we head into the fifth day of the conference, just a quick reminder to visit the virtual book exhibit. As a delegate, you are invited to take 20% off the price of any Wiley Book.