New Philosophy Compass Issue, August 2011

The latest issue of Philosophy Compass is now available on Wiley Online Library

Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art
Ideal Observer Theories in Aesthetics (pages 513–522)
Stephanie Ross
Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2011.00416.x
Logic & Language
Proof Theory for Modal Logic (pages 523–538)
Sara Negri
Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2011.00418.x
Naturalistic Philosophy
The Instrumental Value of Explanations (pages 539–551)
Tania Lombrozo
Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2011.00413.x
Philosophy of Religion
Naturalistic Explanation for Religious Belief (pages 552–563)
David Leech and Aku Visala
Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2011.00414.x
Anselmian Theism (pages 564–571)
Yujin Nagasawa
Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2011.00415.x
Teaching & Learning Guide
Teaching & Learning Guide for: Logic and Divine Simplicity (pages 572–574)
Anders Kraal
Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-9991.2011.00417.x
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The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Maryan Czajkowski

Ed Yong (via Pharyngulareports on a cool study conducted by psychologist Nicholas Epley:

Epley asked different groups of volunteers to rate their own beliefs about important issues such as abortion, same-sex marriage, affirmative action, the death penalty, the Iraq War, and the legalisation of marijuana. The volunteers also had to speculate about God’s take on these issues, as well as the stances of an “average American”, Bill Gates (a celebrity with relatively unknown beliefs) and George Bush (a celebrity whose positions are well-known).

The result: “In every case, [Epley] found that people’s own attitudes and beliefs matched those they suggested for God more precisely than those they suggested for the other humans.”

Ed says that Epley’s study shows that “relying on a deity to guide one’s decisions and judgments is little more than spiritual sockpuppetry.”  (A sockpuppet is a “false identity through which a member of an Internet community speaks with or about himself or herself, pretending to be a different person, like a ventriloquist manipulating a hand puppet” — Wikipedia.)

I can think of at least one other plausible interpretation of this study.

Continue reading “The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Maryan Czajkowski”