Nigel Warburton ‘resigns’ from the world of academic philosophy

A lot of professional philosophers lack the imagination required to think about what it’s like not to understand something. Some have got into a complacent habit of speaking to each other in a kind of technical language, which is almost at times the avoidance of doing philosophy.

nigel_warburton…So says Nigel Warburton in this fascinating interview with The Philosopher’s Magazine, outlining some of his frustrations with academic philosophy today, and the reasons he’s recently resigned his position with the Open University.

It’s a lucid and provocative interview, the main thrust of which is that (a) philosophy should properly be in the business of exploring ideas that matter to people and (b) it has stagnated to the extent that it no longer does so, with some exceptions. Why, asks Warburton, have philosophers been so silent on important public debates like those surrounding freedom of expression, gay marriage, 9/11?

Hypatia Virtual Issue: Embodiment

Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist PhilosophyEmbodiment has been a central theme in feminist philosophy from its early days. The essays selected here illuminate how the topic of embodiment in general has been broached over the years by Hypatia authors, how it has developed, and what topics have received the most focus. Hypatia has been the site of some of the most innovative feminist theorizing on this subject, from the groundbreaking early work of Luce Irigaray and Ann Ferguson to the innovative developments of Kelly Oliver, Lois McNay, Margaret Whitford, and Alison Stone, just to name a few.

There are many ways to define what embodiment has meant in feminist philosophy, and this collection showcases the expanse of issues that the concept of embodiment has engendered. In general, embodiment has signaled the idea that there is a constitutive relationship of the lived body to thought, to knowledge, and to ethics, taking leave of the modern idea that bodies can be left behind as the mind does its work. Such dualism was rarely allowed women, after all. But, beyond thinking our way past dualism, feminist philosophers have also sought new ways to conceptualize the materiality of bodies, the discursive nature of embodied experience, and the contested figure of the maternal body. Within feminist theory itself there has occurred a lively debate over dualism, naturalism, essentialism, and gender normativity in relationship to embodiment.

Read Linda Martin Alcoff’s complete Introduction here.

Read the Embodiment Virtual Issue here.

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Whether you want to keep track of broad trends across philosophy  or focus on a subfield, the Spotlight App is an indispensable tool for your research and teaching.

Call for Papers: The Metaphysics of Time and Modality

Thought: A Journal of PhilosophyFor this special issue of Thought we invite papers that make a contribution to either the metaphysics of time or of modality, or that illuminate the connections between them.

Metaphysicians of modality argue over whether ontology extends beyond the actual just as metaphysicians of time argue over whether ontology extends beyond the present; and we might also ask whether it is a stable position to hold that reality includes the non-present but not the non-actual. There are modal analogues of McTaggart’s infamous argument for the unreality of time, and we can ask whether the modal and temporal arguments stand or fall together. We might wonder whether trans-world identity should be treated differently from identity across time, and whether if existence is contingent it must also be temporary, etc.

Papers should correspond to the standard Thought guidelines and be no longer than 4500 words, including footnotes. Papers are to be submitted before 31st May 2013. When submitting please ensure you select article type as “The Metaphysics of Time and Modality Special Issue” to ensure your paper is reviewed via the special issue route.

Please see Author Guidelines for details on how to submit.

Thought: A Journal of Philosophy

ThoughtRead the second issue of Thought: A Journal of Philosophy for free!

Thought, edited by Crispin Wright, John Divers and Carrie Jenkins and published on behalf of the Northern Institute of Philosophy, is dedicated to the publication of short (less than 4,500 words), original, philosophical papers in the areas of epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophy of logic, philosophy of math, and philosophy of mind.

The editors of Thought hope to expose the readers of Thought to the most central and significant issues and positions in contemporary philosophy that fall under its remit. To that end, all readers are encouraged to continue the discussion in the new Thought Blog, which provides a forum for readers of and contributors to the journal to discuss the latest papers.

Read Thought‘s second issue here, and then register for the Thought Blog to share your thoughts!

The Philosopher’s Eye gets a new home

The Philosopher’s Eye has moved to thephilosopherseye.com
PLEASE UPDATE YOUR BOOKMARKS

So we finally got our act together and separated the Philosopher’s Eye from our sister journal, Philosophy Compass. You may have noticed the shiny new domain name (and that we’re no longer hosted on the Philosophy Compass domain). We’re still affiliated with Compass, which has also had a bit of a makeover. But we’ve been covering a broad range of philosophy news (not just Compass-related stuff) for some time now; hence the new, separate identity.

Best,

The Philosopher’s Eye

Happy 75th Birthday to The Hobbit!

To celebrate the sixtyfifteenth birthday of J.R.R. Tolkien’s much-loved tale we’d like to give away a brand new advance copy of ‘The Hobbit and Philosophy’ publishing in November. You can read a free chapter here, right now, but just for fun we’d like to invite you to tell us, in the style of Tolkien, why we should give you our precious as a birthday present. The rules are as follows:

  1. One paragraph or less
  2. Posted in the comments field below
  3. Let’s keep it clean

The winner will be chosen by us based on originality, logical brilliance, hobbityness or just plain making the effort to have a go. The decision of the judges will be final. Competition closes October 5th. Good Luck.